Ice core dating definition - Ice Core Dating - TalkOrigins Archive


Though ice cores have proven to be one of the most valuable climate records to date, they only provide direct evidence about temperature and rainfall where ice still exists, though they hint at global conditions. Marine sediment cores cover a broader area—nearly 70 percent of the Earth is covered in oceans—but they only give tiny hints about the climate over the land. Soil and rocks on the Earth’s surface reveal the advance and retreat of glaciers over the land surface, and fossilized pollen traces out rough boundaries of where the climate conditions were right for different species of plants and trees to live. Unique water and rock formations in caves harbor a climate record of their own. To understand the Earth’s climate history, scientists must bring together all of these scattered threads into a single, seamless story.

There are models of our planet’s ancient climate which hinted there would need to be low levels of CO2 to trigger ice ages. But according to Science Magazine, proxies that came from the fossils of animals who dwelt in shallow oceans had hinted at higher CO2 levels. The proxies may need to be re-calibrated if the new ice core dating holds up.


Ice core dating definition

Ice core dating definition