Dating squier serial numbers - Squier Serial Numbers - FDP - Forum


The Japanese Fender serial numbers from 1982 -- 1984 have a few oddities. The first Japanese models were Fender Reissues or Vintage guitars. Fender wanted to differentiate the American made Reissue and Vintage guitars from the Japanese ones, so Fender substituted a "JV" serial number, Japanese Vintage, for the "V" serial number on the American guitars. The JV serial numbers started with JV followed by five digits. These numbers were stamped or engraved in the neck plate of Stats and basses and the bridge of Teles. The JV models also had the Made in Japan decal on either the headstock or the neck heel.

What we do know about the early Korean days was that there were three different plants: the Samick pant, the Young Chang plant, and the Sung-Eum plant. Guitars produced by Samick used a serial number starting with an "S" followed by six digits. Usually the first digit represented the year of production. The Young Chang and Sung-Eum guitars used a serial number starting with an "E" followed by six digits. The first number on the "E" serial numbers is a little confusing. It does stand for the year of production in a way. The first year Young Chang produced guitars with in 1987-1988, but they didn't use a "7" or an "8" as the first number. They used a "1" because it was the first year of production. An "E2" serial number was then used for 1989 since it was the second year of production. At this point, they decided to start corresponding the serial number with the actual year, so in 1990 they used an "E0" serial number. In 1991, they reused an "E1" serial number. It doesn't get more confusing than that, right? Here's how to tell the duplicate serial numbers apart. The 1980s guitars' serial numbers were written in silver ink. The 1990s numbers were written in black.


Dating squier serial numbers

Dating squier serial numbers